MILLENNIAL TALENT

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HIRING AND RETAINING

MILLENNIAL TALENT

10 tips to help you get inside the millennial mindset

 

MILLENNIALS ARE EVERYWHERE THESE DAYS

But just who are these mysterious characters that (supposedly) frequent the local coffee shop eating up all the avocado toast?

They’re everyone born between roughly 1983 and 1995 – and, it’s true, you’re about to see a whole lot more of them around the office. According to the LinkedIn Global Recruiting Trends 2018 report, millennials will make up to 60% of the workforce by 2020. With this large influx of necessary but young talent, growing pains caused by generational differences can increase the risk of miscommunication.


According to Gallup, millennial turnover costs the US economy a head-spinning
$30.5 billion annually. It’s time to officially rethink our views on millennials’ work preferences and adjust hiring and management styles to effectively hire and retain the best young talent. Here are 10 tips to help you get there.

 


 

1. STRESS THE IMPORTANCE OF THEIR WORK

When you reach out to the younger generation with a job opportunity, give them more than just a list of duties and responsibilities.

Stress the importance of the position and how it fits into the larger strategy of the company. During your initial outreach to candidates, emphasize the specific tasks
they would be responsible for and the role they would play on the team.

 

2. AVOID THE CORPORATE JARGON

Millennials and Gen Z are well accustomed to sales pitches.

In fact, they’ve been exposed to more advertisements than any other generation in history. They know the old tricks and are unimpressed with dated and superfluous
language. They’re much more likely to gravitate toward companies that speak to them in a succinct, relatable way. And they’re more comfortable with leaders who make a concerted effort to be as inclusive in the workplace as possible. Take a look at your job ads that target millennials and be sure to clear them of corporate speak, buzzwords, or any phrasing that could be interpeted as divisive.

 

3. BE A MENTOR, NOT A BOSS

Many millennials enter the workforce wanting to make an impact right away – whether or not they’re actually in a leadership position.

Channel their desire to be agents of change by helping new hires plan where they want to be five years from now. It won’t just be for altruism’s sake since you’ll find more success in retaining hires that have a clear roadmap of their profession. Millennials want to know they’ll be able to advance their careers within the company they choose to join. Make sure young hires have the opportunity to cross-train with employees across departments. This will help them increase their knowledge of your company and build their skills for a larger role in the future.

 

4. GIVE PRAISE WHERE PRAISE IS DUE

Younger generations (and older ones as well) prefer to feel like what they’re doing is important and that they’re on the right track.

Recognize, share, and reward exceptional work publicly whenever possible. You could also take your praise to the next level by implementing a milestone
rewards program – this type of recognition encourages employees of all ages to work toward a goal and increases job satisfaction.

 

5. SUPPORT FLEXIBLE SCHEDULES (IF POSSIBLE)

For many industries, the traditional 9-to-5 setup is becoming increasingly outdated.

Many younger employees would rather have a job with flexible hours, telecommuting opportunities, and extra vacation time. To members of older generations this can come off as lazy – but many younger employees swear this setup makes them more productive. And there’s a big upside for employers as well – flexibility gives credit to millennials being “always on.” Let employees know that as long as they meet deadlines and goals and attend all meetings, their schedule is up to them

 

6. IT’S NOT JUST MONEY THEY’RE AFTER

In addition to offering a competitive salary, keep your employees happy by providing perks like casual dress codes, family-friendly policies, health club memberships, or tuition reimbursement.

Even the smallest perk can go a long way, and many of them are subsidized, inexpensive, or free. On top of perks, make sure your company values work-life balance – millennials may start to look for new opportunities if they feel their lives are consumed by work.

 

7. BE OPEN TO NEW COMMUNICATION STYLES

A key difference with younger generations is the ubiquity of communication channels.

From the more traditional face-to-face and over-the-phone conversations to newer channels like messaging apps, there have never been as many communication channels as there are now. Understand how your young employees and new hires prefer to communicate, and make an effort to incorporate that channel into your workflow.

 

8. MORE FEEDBACK, FEWER PROBLEMS

Some might call it impatience and others might call it a problem with the traditional job review process – either way, younger employees usually expect real-time feedback.

They want to know if they’re doing a good job or if they should adjust their plan of attack. Set up a program to allow for this type of immediate feedback. This doesn’t need to be overly formal – a simple weekly catch-up can do wonders to keep an open and honest relationship between yourself and them.

 

9. HELP YOURSELF BY HELPING THE COMMUNITY

Many young people are passionate about global challenges and are open to getting
involved with the community.

Encourage them to get involved by holding regular fundraisers and organizing community outreach events or other nonprofit-driven projects that will allow millennials to do good for their communities. Opportunities to be involved with “good causes” at the local level, many of which are enabled by employers, provide millennials with a greater feeling of influence and boost job satisfaction

 

10. EMBRACE THEIR #TECHSKILLS

It should come as no surprise that, having been raised with cutting-edge technology, the majority of millennials are more tech-savvy than older generations.

Following the trend, it’s expected that digital natives in Gen Z and beyond will be even more tech-savvy than millennials. That’s why it’s crucial to embrace technology now – both in the workplace and in your recruiting. Always be on the lookout for ways you can use technology to solve both age-old and new challenges.

Source: Linked In – Talent Solutions